Peer recognition

The power of peer praise: The “why” and “who” in employee recognition

What can we learn about peer recognition from a Nobel Prize winner in economics and a piece of advice relating to how to raise children. Two things, I suggest. First, employee recognition is likely to be even more important than we thought it was. Second, employee recognition should come not just from management but also from colleagues. How do we get from Nobel Prizes and child rearing to these conclusions? Well that takes a bit more explanation.

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Measuring and monitoring organisational wellbeing

The biggest returns are generated by the most dynamic businesses and the most dynamic businesses are built by the most highly motivated – and happiest – staff. These organisations are able to:

  • Attract and retain the best staff, while reducing staff turnover;
  • Achieve higher levels of job satisfaction and motivation;
  • Improve productivity, efficiency and effectiveness;
  • Deliver the best results on the bottom line.

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Employee engagement and retention

Frequent employee recognition and productive wellbeing

We’ve all been there – our workloads are piling up; consistently churning out work to meet yet more work with little thanks or praise for our efforts. Unfortunately this cycle is all too common in workplaces across the world, and while work is being produced, it also comes with a number of by-products: stress and low morale. Mental health organisation Mind produced recent research around work based stress that revealed around a third of employees said that stress impacted their working life and 19% felt they couldn’t talk to their employers about their problem.

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Steve Jobs helped design Pixar offices

Workplace communication and employee engagement at Pixar

I’m not sure how many times I’ve written the words ‘employee engagement’ and ‘employee communication’ in the past week, but with my new obsession to find decent blogging websites about such topics, I stumbled across the interesting subject of Pixar.

“Steve Jobs believed that unplanned collaborations were vitally important to the company culture, this atrium space was to act as a melting pot of meeting space.” (Stephen Searer)

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