The importance of investing in workplace culture for employee engagement

While the topics of company culture and employee engagement are making strides in terms of popularity, the unfortunate reality is that many employers remain sceptical of programs which seek to implement tools to improve these aspects of the workplace. Too often, these “warm and fuzzy” notions are passed off as unimportant or not worthwhile for investment. Fortunately, the case can be made for investment in workplace culture, not just in terms of anticipated outcome for employee satisfaction. Additionally, it has been demonstrated concretely that employee engagement always  delivers results which impact the company bottom line.

The business case for employee engagement

Utilising company culture to engage employees can result in your employees being driven to go above and beyond the confines of their job description. They tend to be more creative, giving their projects more effort and more hours. Customer service performance also skyrockets when employees are well engaged, in turn leading to more satisfied customers who buy more product, are more loyal to the company brand, subsequently driving product margins and repeat business. In fact, it has been found that for every 10% improvement in commitment by an employee, will lead to an overall 2% increase in employee performance.

Like many things in life, an employer may overestimate their competence in this area. Just as 80% of drivers believe they have above-average driving skills, a fact which statistically can never be true, employees tend to overestimate the current level of engagement of their employees. This can lead an inertia towards change, as it will generally be felt that nothing needs to be done. However, it is unlikely that your company has a majority of well-engaged employees unless you have already made concerted efforts to improve company culture, as it has been found that x% of employees in Australian workplaces are actively disengaged. However, to break this illusion of competence, it is easy to track and measure the health of the culture of your workplace to make the case for investment.

 

Measuring company culture

Start to track data in the following areas to get a picture of the current baseline health of your company’s culture:

         Employee retention metrics

         Employee performance and productivity metrics

         Participation in events and optional company activities

         Participation in training and development programs (if applicable)

         Feedback

         Glassdoor reviews

         HR incident reports – specifically looking for patterns of discrimination and harassment

Utilising these data points can help point to both problem areas to focus on, but also highlight strengths. After all, it is one thing to find the negatives, but a key aspect of a healthy company culture is that positivity permeates, and thus you should make an effort to set an example of positivity in presenting the data in the first instance. These data also serve the purpose of a guide to indicate how well current measures to improve company culture are translating across into actual employee engagement. Finally, don’t let your efforts slip to fall victim to the tyranny of time. Ensure that you review the data at regular intervals to ensure that employee engagement is still on track, or hold seminars to discuss new challenges as they arise.

WooBoard is a peer to peer recognition platform where your employees can send public messages of thanks and appreciation to their colleagues. Sign up for your free 14-Day Trial of WooBoard today.

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