Volunteering: a fulfilling strategy for employee engagement

Employee engagement is ever-increasingly important in the postmodern technologically-influenced workplace. Yet, the evidence suggest that overwhelmingly, employees are not engaged in their roles. The reasons for this are multifactorial, but one example is lack of greater connection to the world around them. Ideally, a role can be productive in a way that enables an employee to feel they are serving a greater good, that their work be useful to greater society.

Mostly this is true in many industries, but it is not especially obvious in some cases. Sometimes, an employee can become trapped in the everyday monotony of the workplace and finds themself only working to collect a paycheck. If the reasons why the workplace is effective in greater society are not immediately evident, a great strategy is to engage your team in volunteering. This is supported by a 2011 Deloitte Volunteer IMPACT survey which found that adult employees aged 21-35 who are frequently involved in workplace volunteer activities are nearly twice as likely to very satisfied with the progression of their career. Additionally, volunteer programs improve the corporate responsibility impact of your company, which in turn, improves its brand and favorability in the eyes of clients.

Improved Productivity

Volunteering as a workplace works becauses employees strengthen their commitment to work together towards a common goal. This improves productivity because each individual worker is steered towards the sense of being part of something bigger, and inspiration to do their part in order to not let the team down. The reward in terms of employee engagement and productivity can be reaped almost immediately.

Social networking

The impact of volunteering on social networks is immediately discernible. Not only will teammates social connections be improved towards one another, but they will meet other like-minded individuals from the community to socialise with, in turn, improve their broader social capital. This will not only benefit them in the short term to improve their wellbeing and reduce isolation, but this integration between your workers and the broader community with the visibility of them taking part in a volunteering role will improve the brand of your company.

The Sweet Spot

Too much investment in volunteering can be a negative, however. When volunteering commitments are too time consuming, individuals can be burdened and irritable with the politics involved. The “sweet spot” is for employees to be involved in 2 – 10 hours of volunteering weekly. Volunteering Australia stated that an hour of volunteering was worth $27.45 in 2010, and therefore, you can boast $527,040 per annum if you have 50 employees donating 8 hours a week of their time.

Case Study: Orange Sky

This is an organisation which provides mobile vans for homeless persons to shower or to wash their clothes, a simple luxury most of us take for granted. The time commitment is on a once-weekly basis, and the volunteering is rich with fulfillment and human connection. Homeless persons often have interesting stories to tell and your employees will benefit greatly from the social connection. So get your company involved and enjoy the fun and the benefits to the bottom line!

WooBoard is a peer to peer recognition platform where your employees can send public messages of thanks and appreciation to their colleagues. Sign up for your free 14-Day Trial of WooBoard today.

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